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of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
can call the obama doctrine, when to deploy u.s. military forces around the world. he laid out the case when it's in the united states interest to use military force, when it's in the united states interest not to use military force, and this is the example that he gave, this is going to be the precedent, what the united states has done now in libya, presumably given the explosion of unrest that's happening right now throughout north africa and the middle east, if there are similar circumstances that develop in other countries, whether in syria, or yemen and bahrain, and the potential of mass slaughter of civilians is there, the pressure will be on this president to go ahead and authorize what the president authorized in libya. and the greatest potential for the u.s., if there's a revolution, and if there's serious unrest in iran and the people are standing up against mahmoud ahmadinejad and the i ayatollahs take similar action as far as iran is concerned. i think we can call this the obama doctrine. >> and he also made it clear what the limits of this mission is as he sees it
. >>> in chile, president obama tried to clarify. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> senators on both sides of the aisle are concerned about the end game. >> if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. >> we do not have a clear diplomatic policy or a clear statement of foreign policy that is accompanying this military operation. >> there is a growing rift in the coalition over who should be in control. >> no apparent cooperation. some people want to turn it over to nato, the maiamericans and t brits. >> french president ruffled feathers by announcing publicly that french fighters were in the air before his international counterparts were briefed. whoever is in control, arizona republican senator john mccain says, there is only one way to end it. >> a stalemate is a very, very badout come. american policy is that gadhafi must go. >>> a naval facility was hit overnight east of tripoli. robert gates is in moscow. gates says gadhafi is misleading the russia
congress to continue to be involved. nancy pelosi said u.s. action will be strengthened by consultation with congress. last week a lot of them spoke under the democratic side were critical of president obama for not briefing congress in regards to what the mission was in libya. they feel on the democratic side more aware of what that is and want to be briefed regularly. secretary of state hillary clinton will be beyond with the foreign relations committee. they expect a lot of questions to her, but in terms of setting a precedent for the democratic party to believe in, president obama did accomplish that goal. he did not satisfy republicans at all. one interesting caveat i will say, senator john mccain, the president's opponent actually said he enjoyed hearing president obama clearly state what the policy was in libya. he remained shall we say unaware of how gadhafi would be removeed fr per wldikmo iorti outh, t ppti o what the president's actions were there. john mccain maybe going back to the maverick style by being more supportive of president obama than his conference there. >> the
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
the u.s. toll the military personnel in japan to keep around the plant. so, we believe the evacuation zone now is voluntary evacuation but that is causing a problem for those who want to get appear because a number of people who is left but there is no gas so people have cars but have not gas for the cars. so they cannot get away from the radiation at the fukushima plants and the highly radioactive water is leaking from four of the troubled nuclear reactors and they think it is seeping out from reactor number three the troublesome of the lot of them, and where we saw the workers trying to tackle the situation, and they received radioactive burns on their legs and feet because they were in a pool of radioactive water that seeped into the boots and were not protected enough for them they have actually absorbed radiation into their bodies, two of the workers have, and the doctors say the prognosis is not looking good. a bit of good news, finally, from japan, and that is tokyo's tap water and the radioactive isotopes they found on when is back in safe levels and has not stopped people fro
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
to our correspondent with the opposition right now. president obama tried to explain why the u.s. intervened military as gadhafi was closing in on benghazi a little more than a week ago. >> at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. an international mandate for action. a broad coalition preached to join us. the support of arab countries, and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. we also had the ability to stop gadhafi's forces in their tracks without putting american troops on the ground. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and more profoundly our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances, would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> a lot more on what the president said in a moment. we'll also look tonight in an incredibly disturbing incident that looked at a tripoli hotel full of journalists. this woman was dragged away by gadhafi officials, we have updates about what's happened since. i'll talk to nick robert son about it. the
can convey a message to the american people why it is consistent with u.s. foreign policy goals? >> i do. we have to keep in mind the uprise negligent middle east - uprising in the middle east lends to developments. in the short run we can't controll the events completely. this is important in the middle east and to abanon the people of libya would have let qaddafi slaughtter his own people and put a damper on the efforts of the youngg people in the middle east and small democrats and those who want to liberalize those societies there. >> even with nato in command, are you concerned that ultimately the pressure will be on the u.s. if qaddafi fights for months? >> i am opposed to putting our own soldiers on the ground. i believe that the coalition that is in place led by nato and not the united states will find the right balance of approaches to support the people in libya and to see that there is a new regime in place and support the spirit of revolution and spirit of change and democratic societies in the middle east . so we have to watch this, and congress has a role to play in advi
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
is you are not entirely convinced u.s. forces will be on the ground in libya. as you answer that question, this was apparently one of the president's first demands. no american boots on the sands in libya. why could you think that could change? >> i think they can get into a stalemate. the only way they will be able to win is to put in, quote, a stablization force. because i think the tribes in tripoli versus the tribes in benghazi, the fact is, they could go to a stalemate and we are looking like we did in april, may, june of 2003 in iraq. you have those dissident forces. those tribes that do not wants to be ruled by the tribes coming from benghazi that you will have a counter insurgency. and we have seen that movie before. bill: your points is the rebels would not be able to hold on to a win. >> right. using the logic of our intervention in libya should we not be in syria, bahrain, north korea, iran, or yemen? a lot of countries. why libya, general? >> that's the question that befuddles me. i believe it's this responsibility to protect strategy that samantha powers conceived and has bee
questions out there about the mission in libya, what's the goal of the u.s.? what's the exit strategy? how will the u.s. military be involved? are these all questions he sufficiently answered? >> i think did he. if he's getting criticized that heavily from left and right, he's striking a balance. he made clear that we went in to avoid what he described as violence on a horrific scale in benghazi, that again the mandate of the u.n. coalition that nato is now leading is to protect libyan civilians, i think that makes very clear what success looks like there, it means that libyan civilians are safe, safe in their houses, safe in their cities. at the same time, he made very clear that it is u.s. policy, and the policy of many of our allies. that libya needs to have a new government that responds to the demands of the libyan people. and we will pursue every diplomatic and economic means to that end and leveling the play be field militarily will certainly help. >> if he removes his forces from around misrata, pulls back troops to tripoli, and has all these armed civilians in serte and other plac
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
the nation. saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter in mass graves before taking action. >> gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. and its allies are doing enough to push him out. we will talk with tu.s. baee ambassador to the u.n. and john mccain. >>> the snake hunt. the venomous cobra that escaped from the bronx zoo remains on loose this morning creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers "early" this tuesday morning, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. welcome back to the country. the time zone, the program. >> nice to be back sitting next to you, chris. >>> things were busy while i was away. >>> more on the president speech's last night and that ongoing battle for libya. this morning, rebel forces are macing more resistance from gadhafi militias. a state department diplomat is going to benghazi and meet with rebel leaders for the first time. in the meantime, secretary of st
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama addresses the nation saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi's forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. >> but nearly two weeks in to the mission, gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. is doing enough to push him out. we'll talk with the president's ambassador to the u.n. and with republican senator john mccain. >>> walmart lawsuit. a massive sex discrimination suit against the retail giant heads to the supreme court today. it could involve more than a million female employees and cost america's biggest employer billions of dollars. >>> and the snake hunt. the venomous cobra remains on the loose creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. >> good to have you back. welcome back to the country, the time zone. >> nice to be back sitting
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
say really quickly, there are two institutions. i'm leaving out an important institution, the u.s. military and willie geist. >> i know. >> you look at willie geist's poll numbers. >> look at him. >> do you trust him to read your sports every morning? >> do you want me to do sports this morning. >> better if we don't, mika, with due respect. >>> i've been pushing this yankees as david, red sox as goliath. the new york papers, check this out, the yankees, the little team that could. >> what is that? >> and look at this one, hot dogs -- >> highest payroll in sports. >> hot dog as in underdogs. the yankees are the hot underdog in baseball. beautiful yankee stadium. there it s. that's a little team. >> that's a beautiful mall. seriously. >> there's great shopping in there, joe. there really is. for a lot of people, today is the best dave the year. opening day of major league baseball. here's some of the games, a breakdown. you have the yankees opening. hopefully if the weather holds up against the tigers. the drives, a lot of people picking them to win that division. the nats if that
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)